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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
to tackle the impending fiscal cliff but the president and the speaker of the house john boehner each drawing lines that they say they will not cross. the major hurdles, that threat to send the economy into a tailspin, that's coming up next. >>> plus a nascar race turning into a full-scale brawl. look at this. mayhem breaking out of the everybody going at it. we'll tell you what set it off. after this. ve lately. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. jenna: well come back, everyone. now let's return to the economy. the president and house speaker john boehner are suggesting they are willing to compromise to prevent our economy from going over that so-called fiscal cliff but both sides are digging in their heels whether or not to race tax rates for the wealthy. rich edson of the fox business network watching
seem to be moving closer to a key sticking point. >> speaker boehner seemed to suggest that he was open to closing loopholes, to real tax reform. can you get there by just closing loopholes, or will it take more than that? >> well, look, i don't want to prejudge the discussions. i think that the speaker's comments have been encouraging and there is obviously money to be gained by closing some of these, closing some of these loopholes and applying them to deficit reduction. there are a lot of ways to skin this cat. gregg: illinois congressman peter roskam joins us. he is on the house ways and means committee. he joins us from chicago. good to see you. house speaker boehner says he will oppose any increase in tax rates. and the white house said on friday, and i will read this directly, the president will veto any bill that includes an extension of the current tax rates for those earning more than $250,000 a year. so congressman, where is the come promize? >> i think the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. we've heard this language coming from the white house before. we hea
they will or will not go on this issue. house speaker john boehner says he believes they can reach a deal. >> i don't think anyone, on either side of the aisle under estimates the difficulty that faces us. but i do think the spirit of cooperation that you've seen over the last week from myself and my team, from democrats across the aisle, from the president, have created an atmosphere where i think that, i'm, i remain optimistic. i was born with a glass half-full. >> what i have told leaders privately as well as publicly, is that we can not afford to extend the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. what we can do is make sure that middle class taxes don't go up. 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. martha: doug schoen, former pollster to president bill clinton. monica crowley, radio talk show host. both are fox news contributors and what i'm hearing through both of those quotes we're pretty much where we were the last time that the president and john boehn
republicans. listen who what house speaker john boehner said about that throwing cold water on it. >> at this point i think that the standing committees of the house whether they be the oversight committee or the intelligence committee are working diligently on these issues, and at this point i think that's appropriate. >> now, what john mccain and his colleagues are arguing is that there's too much stove piping going on. there are too many committees, and twoul today is a good example. there are hearings going on all over capitol hill and then probably will continue to be. they think it all should be streamlined into one committee, but, suzanne, using the term watergate, using the term coverup, saying what did he know, when did he know it, talking about the president, not exactly a way to get bipartisan support for something that, you know, democrats clearly don't want. it is absolutely -- you mentioned at the beginning, very, very tense, particularly between these two old rivals, john mccain and president obama. >> not the way to bite -- get the bipartisanship going. okay, dana.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)